Thoughts of a Man

Q&A

Q. How did you come up with such a broad range of topics and ideas for your book?
A.
 My profession exposes me to the life stories and struggles of many people. In addition I’ve experienced a rich and diverse life. The combination of my profession and life experiences provided the topics and ideas for my book.

Q. Are Thoughts of a Man, a result of personal experiences?
A.
 I’m an observant person and a thinking man that connects the dots in my life and the lives of others. Being honest with myself is a key factor in understanding the motives, feelings and experiences of others. So in a sense, I can’t escape my personal experiences but I’m trying to capture human experiences rather than my personal experiences.

Q. Why so passionate; some of your poetry almost sounds angry?
A.
 Certain subjects are best expressed with passion and anger.

Q. Is there a light hearted side to your book?
A.
 I tried to include the whole spectrum of human emotions. There’s light and darkness, love and hate, happiness and sorrow; a full life means moving fluidly through it all. I tried to reflect that in my book.

Q. Would women be interested in Thoughts of a Man?
A.
 Women are curious about how a man thinks; they will want to read my book—in secret of course.

Q. Do you fear your book will be too controversial?
A.
 I fear it won’t be controversial enough. Without controversy my message won’t have a voice to challenge the radical insanity of our time.

Q. How do you pronounce your last name Pakai?
A.
 Good question. It is pronounced Pah-kigh